You can find a full schedule here and a list and description of panels, talks and workshops here and below .

 

Early Arrivals

Thursday, November 1, 2018

4:30 – 6:30 PM

OPEN HOUSE

PRX Podcast Garage Open House
@ 267 Western Ave, Allston, MA 02134

Come and learn about the PRX Podcast Garage, a community recording studio and classroom dedicated to the craft of audio storytelling. PRX, the award-winning public media company and founder of Radiotopia, opened the Podcast Garage in August 2016 in Allston, to support the work of local audio producers and storytellers. The facilities feature a four-person studio with state-of-the-art recording and mixing equipment as well as a community space with weekly events and workshops.


6:30 – 8:30 PM

WORKSHOP

Three Things your Podcast Needs with Eric Nuzum
@ 267 Western Ave, Allston, MA 02134

Every successful podcast has a magical, unique combination of three elements: Story. Character. Voice. An audio producer’s ability to succeed depends on how they offer distinctive answers to all three.

In this workshop with noted podcast creator Eric Nuzum, we’ll unpack what each means, share examples of excellence in all three, and provide some tips on how to define your project. Then we will all work together on how your project can excel at all three.

REGISTER HERE


7:30 – 9:30 PM


LIVE PODCAST EVENT

The Memory Palace
@ Somerville Armory, 191 Highland Ave, Somerville

Nate DiMeo will be giving a live performance of The Memory Palace, a storytelling podcast and public radio segment about the past.

REGISTER HERE


8:30 – 11:30 PM

KICKOFF PARTY

Sound Education Kickoff/The Memory Palace Afterparty
@ Article 24, 458 Western Ave, Brighton, MA 02135

Join us for a kickoff gathering at Article 24, within walking distance of the PRX’s Podcast Garage. We’ll also be celebrating with members of Radiotopia and The Memory Palace. For those on FB, you can RSVP here.

 

Conference

Friday, November 2, 2018

8:00 – 9:00 AM


REGISTRATION

@ Andover Hall, Braun Room
Coffee and light breakfast will be served.


9:00 – 10:15 AM

WELCOME & KEYNOTE 1

@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

Welcome: Zachary Davis (Ministry of Ideas)

Opening Keynotes: Diane Moore, The Importance of Critical Education in these Critical Times; Liz Covart, The History of Audio Education

WELCOME & KEYNOTE 2

@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

Welcome: Doug Metzger (Literature and History)

Opening Keynotes: Dan Cohen, Bridging the Academic-Public Divide Through Podcasts; Diane Moore, The Importance of Critical Education in these Critical Times


10:30 - 11:45 AM

PANEL

Audio Teaching Strategies: Classics
@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

Greece, Rome, the Ancient Near East, archaeology, and Greek and Latin get a lot of love from the world of educational audio, from hobbyists  offering general overviews of ancient wars to linguists teaching you how to scan poetry in archaic Greek. This panel will discuss methods that successful hosts have used to bring specific topics from antiquity to large numbers of listeners.

PANEL

How to Create a Show Concept
@ Andover Hall, Room 102

While there are great audio programs with hundreds – even thousands – of episodes, there are also projects intended to have just a dozen or two shows in order to cover a topic. Whether you’re just starting an educational program, or neck deep in hundreds of episodes, this panel presents research, writing, and coordination strategies for planning, prolonging, and wrapping up educational podcasts episodes and sequences.

PANEL

Audience Growth (coordinated by Audioboom)
@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

There’s no magic trick for growing a podcast audience. It’s a mixture of creating terrific content, having an effective cross-promotional strategy, using social media in conscientious and consistent ways, and changing strategy when you need to. This panel, coordinated by Audioboom, will discuss key strategies for expanding a podcast’s audience.

PANEL

Professors Who Podcast
@ Andover Hall, Room 103

As professional educators become increasingly involved with podcasting, educational podcasts are becoming small parts of course syllabi, and instructors are starting to produce podcasts of their own. At the same time, educational podcasts are hard to fit into a standard academic resume. This panel will discuss the emerging role of educational audio in higher education, how professors can help to make podcasting a recognised part of academic work, and how podcasters can make it easier for educators to use their shows in class.

PANEL

Audio Teaching Strategies: Politics and International Affairs
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

While contemporary news is ubiquitous on today’s airwaves, some hosts and producers approach politics, legislation, and international affairs with the intention of creating educational programs that will be rich and informative years after their episodes are released. This panel will feature audio educators who take a deep and sometimes academic approach to politics and international affairs.

PANEL

Preserve Your Podcast
@ Andover Hall, Rabinowitz Room

Podcasts are at risk of disappearing in the face of rapid shifts in platform, delivery, and recording technology. These issues are endemic to mass media technologies to date (such as reel-to-reels, VHS tapes and CDs). But born-digital content has received less attention -- and it's more at risk. Digital files can be easily wiped, corrupted, replaced with a software update, or is at the mercy of the economic viability of third-party streaming and hosting platforms.

The Mellon Foundation has awarded a grant to the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) to develop traveling workshops, a podcast, and a zine about how podcasters can preserve their work for the future. The project, called Preserve This Podcast, is led by four trained archivists, three of whom will be at Sound Education to walk you through the project and how you can preserve your sounds!


10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

WORKSHOP

Producing High Quality Sound and Content for Your Podcasts with Dianne Ballon
@ Andover Hall, Library Classroom

With the explosion of podcasts hitting the airwaves, what separates the professional from the amateur is high quality sound and content. With over thirty years of recording experience, sound artist Dianne Ballon will introduce the techniques she has employed to achieve high quality productions. Discussion includes how to make optimal recordings in less than ideal situations, such as recording on a busy street, in an office building or in a field with songbirds. Participants will hear sound-rich audio excerpts from stories about a cowboy’s bedroll to the sound of boats creaking at a dock in Iceland. With humor and hindsight, examples of what works and what does not work will be explored. Topics include recording basics, microphone handling and placement, interviewing techniques, and recording with ambient/background sound. Bring your questions and your listening ear.

This workshop is $15. Register for this workshop here.


10:30 - 10:50 AM

TALK

Mind The Gap: Can Podcasting Heal Our National Divide? with Richard Davies (How We Fix It)
@ Andover Hall, Room 117

Using audio clips and ideas from the news solutions podcast, "How Do We Fix It?", Richard Davies looks at three local campaigns and citizen coalitions in Iowa, Minnesota and North Carolina, that seek to renew democracy and bridge divides. Richard will discuss why he believes that the intimate, long-form medium of podcasting can promote constructive conversations and engage listeners with diverse opinions.

TALK

Let's get middle-aged white men away from the podcasting microphone, just joking, some of my favourite podcasts are done by middle-aged white men! with Roifeld Brown (How Jamaica Conquered the World; 10 American Presidents)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 114


11:10 - 11:30 AM

TALK

Narcissism for Fun, Fame, and … Zombies! with Stever Robbins (Get-It-Done Guy)
@
Andover Hall, Room 117

Are you an expert? Or do you just play one on your podcast? Your expert-voice podcasts can be a golden ticket to a powerful reputation. This session will teach you  to build and retain your audience, use your podcast to get past gatekeepers, boost your reputation as an expert, and not screw up when an A-list celebrity is your biggest (or at least richest) fan. Plus whatever else you want to learn. All in 20 minutes. Fasten your seatbelts as Stever Robbins does his best to share everything he’s learned in 11 years as the host of Get-It-Done Guy’s Quick and Dirty Tips to Work Less and Do More, a top-10 iTunes business podcast.

TALK

Godcasts: Approaching Religion and Spirituality in Podcast Form with Blair Hodges (BYU Maxwell Institute Podcast)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 114

There are hundreds of religious-themed podcasts—devotional, apologetic, polemical, educational, and more. Some are overtly tied to faith traditions; others seem entirely secular in scope while sneaking spirituality and morality through the back door. To paraphrase a 19th-century seeker, "Who of all these podcasts are right; or, are they all wrong together? If any one of them be right, which is it, and how shall we know it?" Or is there something right about each in its own way—a spirituality that undergirds the very medium of podcasting itself?


11:40 AM - 12:10 PM

TALK

The Politics of Storytelling with Karen Werner (Strange Radio)
@ Andover Hall, Room 117

The stories we tell as podcasters and radio producers are inevitably cooked in a broth of cultural and political assumptions that inform how we frame and compose a story, how we understand cause and effect, and what poetic or political styles we use to communicate. We will listen to audio pieces about the same topic cooked in different political and cultural broths and discuss the implications of these differing approaches.

TALK

Using Personal Narrative as a Teaching Device with Nick Andersen (Ministry of Ideas)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 114

Podcasting is an incredibly intimate medium, so no matter the topic of your podcast, it's important to recognize your relationship with your listener. Using examples from his work on Ministry of Ideas, as well as from the larger podcasting world and his own successful side career as a storyteller with The Moth, Story Collider and WNYC's Nancy, Nick Andersen will detail how the best way to teach an audience anything is to share something about yourself.


1:00 - 2:15 PM

PANEL

Lessons from Radiolab
@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

Radiolab is one of the most remarkable and successful educational audio programs in production. With a colossal following, the widely respected program is a gold standard for what excellent educational production can do. This panel will walk you through how the Radiolab team plans, produces, and polishes a typical episode.

PANEL

Podcasting 101: The Little Things That Are Big Things
@ Andover Hall, Room 102

This panel is a crash course on the basics of podcasting, designed for attendees who might be interested in starting one. Panelists will discuss the costs and basic setup of an independent podcast, and then go on to talk about tried and true strategies for launching a new show. Hundreds of new programs launch every week, and ultimately this panel will teach you how to make sure yours gets off to a strong start.

PANEL

Structuring Educational Podcast Episodes
@ Andover Hall, Room 103

From catchy introductions to rich and symphonic conclusions and everything in between, there are some tried and true strategies for teaching using audio. Panelists will discuss the pros and cons of various formats (single narrator, interview, discussion, and various hybrids), strategies that have produced their best episodes, and strategies that haven’t worked so well.

PANEL

Audio Teaching Strategies: Social Science
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

Psychology, sociology, and neurobiology all tell us more about ourselves as human beings, and the experiences we have in our communities. These disciplines have been brought to millions of listeners through compelling audio programs. This panel will discuss methods through which podcasters and radio hosts have packaged the social sciences for a broad listening public.

PANEL

The Ethics of Educational Podcasting
@ Andover Hall, Rabinowitz Room

Panelists will discuss their approach to issues such as social responsibility, retractions, advertising, and conflicts of interest.

PANEL

Community Building
@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

Building an educational podcast audience is about more than simply increasing your daily downloads. It’s an exercise in building a community, learning from your audience, answering questions, and superintending a long, evolving program. This panel will explore the best methods of building an educational podcast’s audience, and being an active community leader.


1:20 - 2:20 PM

SPECIAL CONVERSATION

Breaking Tradition - Finding new ways to inform, educate and engage
@ Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

NPR's mission is to "create a more informed public” by offering accessible content that helps better understand and appreciate today’s events, ideas and culture. Thanks to powerful, quality content, NPR has become an important medium for learning and educating across categories inside and outside the classroom. In an interview with Marshall Williams, CEO of Ad Results Media, Anya Grundmann, NPR Senior Vice President for Programming and Audience Development, discusses how NPR’s education-oriented mission informs the ongoing development of what is today the number one podcast program in the country, how audio can change the way we think about education, the key ingredients for a successful podcast and the benefits of leaning into uncertainty.


2:00 - 4:00PM

WORKSHOP

Pitch Workshop sponsored by Castbox
@ The Center for the Study of World Religions (42 Francis Avenue), The Director's Conference Room

As part of Sound Education we are providing a pitch workshop panel on Friday November 2. Any show one year old or less (or in development) is eligible for the workshop.

Those selected to participate in the workshop will be able to pitch their show in front of a panel of experts that will include Eric Nuzum, Kerri Hoffman, Jessica Kupferman, and Galen Beebe. After hearing your pitch, they will give you feedback to help you launch or improve your podcast.

This workshop is sponsored by Castbox. All workshop participants will be eligible to become a Castbox Original show. This includes production help, cross-promotional opportunities and in-app promotions in the Castbox app. You can learn more about Castbox at castbox.fm.


2:30 - 3:45 PM

PANEL

The State of the Pod
@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

This panel will look at the big picture of where podcasting has been and where it’s going.

PANEL

Sound Design and Music for Educational Audio
@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

Beyond the intro and outro dittys, how should you use music in an educational audio show? Should you have breaks? How much of the voiceover should have an instrumental soundtrack? This panel will discuss how engineers and composers do sound design for today’s top shows – some of the theory behind effective music usage, some no-nos, and tips and tricks to get the most of your music clips.

PANEL

Audio Teaching Strategies: Linguistics
@ Andover Hall, Rabinowitz Room

Language, as something everyone uses, is a very personal and often emotional subject. It is not surprising, then, that there is a strong interest in podcasts about language, and a growing number of shows that explore its history, its peculiarities, how we use it, and even the technical aspects of linguistics. This panel will address some of the different perspectives on and approaches to language education in podcasts, and how the verbal medium of podcasting is so well suited to talking about how we talk.

PANEL

Interviewing
@ Andover Hall, Room 103

Interviews of specialists are the backbone of many educational programs. And yet interviewing is a fine art, filled with subtle dos and don’ts that experienced interviewers master over a lifetime. This panel will discuss strategies for preparing for and executing podcast interviews – both in person and over the internet – and further, how successful hosts of interview-based shows turn the raw material of an interview into a compelling story.

PANEL

The Future of Podcasting
@ Andover Hall, Room 102

PANEL

Art and Culture Teaching Strategies
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

True to the spirit of art as a cultural and often daring critical practice, we bring together a range of podcast approaches for teaching and transmitting art and culture. This panel brings together top art history and cultural podcasters with experimental radio artists to create narratives and pose questions about aesthetics, art historical content, and how to convey artistic, social and cultural issues in a gripping and immediate way, all the more of a challenge when discussing visual art in a sonic medium.


TALK

How to Get the Best out of Academics on Your Podcast with David Stenhouse
@ Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

Academics often speak to captive audiences in seminar rooms and lecture theaters. Podcast listeners always have somewhere else to go. How do you work with academic hosts or guests to ensure that you keep your listeners, and don't distort your Professor's message? Topics covered: What's interesting about this? Watch your language. Saying no to Prof. Who is this intended for?

TALK

How to Podcast: A Student's Guide with Kristin Torres
@ Andover Hall, Room 117

Ever wanted to break into podcasting? Could your senior thesis or dissertation provide rich material for an educational podcast like Hardcore History, Ministry of Ideas, or Radiolab? Join Dudley House Literary's Kristin Torres for How to Podcast: A Student's Guide. Kristin, an NPR Next Generation Radio Fellow and former producer on the NPR Arts Desk, will be leading a presentation on how students and researchers like you can get started in podcasting, from finding low-cost and accessible recording and editing tools to finding ways to monetize your show. Open to all Harvard students, as well as students from other universities in the surrounding area. Free admission. Contact Kristin Torres at kstorres@g.harvard.edu with any questions.

2:30 - 3:00 PM


3:10 - 3:40 PM

TALK

The Voluntary Difference with CJ Killmer
@ Andover Hall, Room 117

This presentation will contrast CJ's twelve years of experience teaching college history in a classroom setting with his four years of experience doing history podcasting. The thesis will be that the fundamental differences in experience between the two teaching situations stem from the fact that podcast listeners are consuming the content on a purely voluntarily basis, whereas college students often are not, and in most cases are only in history classes in order to satisfy general education requirements. CJ will explain why he thinks that, the more voluntary an educational situation is, the better it tends to be for both teachers and learners.


3:10 - 4:20 PM

TALK

The History of Podcasting (Is Different Than You May Think) with Andrew Bottomley
@ Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

Most stories about the origins of podcasting begin in 2004 or 2005, when the practice hit the cultural mainstream – “podcast” even becoming the New Oxford American Dictionary’s Word of the Year in 2005. This presentation explores the multiple origins of podcasting, particularly during the years 2000-2005 when it was widely known as “audioblogging” – literally an audible version of blogging. While the audioblog format ultimately failed to take off, certain aesthetics and practices – including a more “intimate,” unscripted style of talk centered around personal experience and self-expression – persisted and remain integral to popular conceptions of podcasting today


3:50 - 4:20 PM

TALK

How to Talk Research Without Being A Snob with Avi Green
@ Andover Hall, Room 117

Listeners need to understand research to make smart choices in an increasingly complex world. But too many researchers speak using insider jargon that can make even enthralling subjects boring. Avi Green is co-host of the Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon podcast. In this talk, Avi will lay out strategies for making research into fascinating, accessible audio.


4:00 - 5:15 PM

PANEL

Audio Teaching Strategies: History
@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

Since 2005, hobbyist and professional podcasters have been crafting elegant audio shows out of the raw materials of complex historical periods, educating millions of grateful listeners in the process. This panel will discuss tried and true strategies for packaging history into audio programs – ones that work regardless of your historical period, funding, or organizational structure.


4:00 - 5:15 PM

PANEL

Audio Teaching Strategies: Science and Technology
@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

STEM programs bring chemistry, physics, mathematics and other disciplines before the general public in compelling ways. But behind their smooth production and marvelous scripts, STEM programs involve intense research, careful judgment calls, and extensive collaboration. This panel will feature top STEM educators discussing effective methods for packaging and producing scientific topics for the public.

PANEL

Making Podcasts Work Financially Presented by RadioPublic
@ Andover Hall, Room 102

Most of us want to make a living podcasting, but how do we actually make it happen? This panel will discuss proven paths for taking podcasting from a hobby to a profession. It is sponsored by our conference partners RadioPublic.

PANEL

Educating From the Margins
@ Andover Hall, Room 103

The first generation of educational audio producers has largely come from privileged communities with access to technology and funding, and the time to record and distribute material. A new generation is emerging, however, seeking to tell stories about their experiences as marginalized citizens, and spread awareness about challenges that face their communities. This panel’s speakers will discuss their work as educators for and about marginalized communities.

PANEL

Audio Teaching Strategies: Philosophy
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

Philosophy is often singled out as a frivolous elective – one which pragmatic career-bound students do best to avoid. Yet philosophy programs of all stamps have gained huge ground in the world of educational podcast listeners. This panel will discuss how philosophy podcasters have used some very different methods to teach their disciplines, and effective strategies for making philosophy accessible and fun in an audio program.

PANEL

Podcasting as a Teaching Tool (K-12)
@ Andover Hall, Rabinowitz Room

Panelists will discuss how podcasting can be a powerful pedagogical tool for K-12 learning.


4:30 - 5:00 PM

TALK

The End of the Golden Age of Podcasting? with Marshall Poe
@
Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

We are in the Golden Age of Podcasting. Countless podcasters are producing countless podcasts about countless subjects. They have made "narrowcasting" in the audio sphere a reality, and in so doing have done an incredible public service. But it could all be coming to an end. Big media is moving into the podcasting space and transforming it in ways that may well be detrimental to "indie podcasters." The big players may consolidate content, audience, and revenue is such a way as to force the indies out of the market, the result being a return to broadcasting or something like it. The podcast community--big media and small--have to think about ways to preserve the incredible richness of content that has grown up in this Golden Age of Podcasting, or that age may end.

TALK

In Pursuit of Ira Glass: The Making of a Non-American This American Life with Mishy Harman

@ Andover Hall, Room 117

Probably like many of you, the first podcast Mishy Harman ever heard was an episode of 'This American Life.' How difficult, he naively thought to himself, would it be to create a local version in his native Israel? Eight years - and six seasons - later, the host of Israel Story, talks about the joys, challenges and perils of telling the story of a country, and a super complicated country at that, through the tales of its people.


5:10 - 5:40 PM

TALK

The Conversation Cure with Chris Lydon
@
Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

TALK

Telling Difficult Stories: Podcasting about Race in America with Kate Ellis
@
Andover Hall, Room 117

Much of the history of racial oppression in the U.S. remains invisible. Kate Ellis will talk about the challenge of crafting stories that make it visible, and why that work is critical in today’s political climate.


6:00 - 7:00 PM

Geological Lecture Hall

Harvard Museum of Natural History
24 Oxford St
Cambridge

KEYNOTE

Listen to Black Women with John Biewen

The struggles against sexism and racism come together in the bodies, and the lives, of black women. John Biewen delivers an episode from the current season of Scene on Radio, MEN, looking at the intersections between male dominance and white supremacy in the United States and the movements to overcome them.


7:00 – 10:30 PM

Harvard Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography
11 Divinity Ave

RECEPTION/PARTY Presented by Himalaya

Join us for a reception/party at the Harvard Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography, where you can enjoy drinks and hors d'oeuvres from Mei Mei surrounded by cultural exhibits, great conversation and the accordionist stylings of the talented Erica Mancini. This reception is sponsored by Himalaya.


 

Keynotes & PUblic Talks

Saturday, November 3, 2018


8:00 AM - 1:00 PM

REGISTRATION & COFFEE

@ Andover Hall, Braun Room


9:00 - 9:50 AM

KEYNOTE

Why Remember Anything At All? with Nate DiMeo (The Memory Palace) @ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

Nate DiMeo, the creator of The Memory Palace podcast and a former Artist in Residence at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art will talk about history and memory in a time of all news all the time.


10:00 - 10:30 AM

PUBLIC TALKS

True Lessons from #Deepfakes with Benjamen Walker (Theory of Everything)
@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

Benjamen Walker talks about technology, and the real and the fake and shares some things he has learned from his recent miniseries False Alarm!

What English Departments Leave Out with Doug Metzger (Literature and History)
@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

University English departments have taken great strides over the past two generations to adjust and broaden the literary canon, all the while using theoretical approaches that teach us to be aware of the cultural role that literature plays. Along the way, however, theoretical and scholarly specialization have sometimes come at the expense of general knowledge of literature and world history, and, more simply, reading these subjects for leisure and personal curiosity.

We Don’t Have MBAs: Entrepreneur Training Through VC Pitches with Kareem Maddox (The Pitch)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 106

Telling Non-European History with Roifield Brown (How Jamaica Conquered the World)
@ Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

From Meghan Markle to Louisa Adams: Using the Present to Enter the Past with Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge and Christine Caccipuoti (Footnoting History)
@ Andover Hall, Room 102

Talking about history doesn’t have to require a pre-existing interest in the past. Join Footnoting History’s Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge and Christine Caccipuoti for a presentation about using modern events like the recent royal wedding of England’s Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle as a gateway to discussing equally-interesting events of bygone times, such as US President John Quincy Adams’ marriage to London-born Louisa Johnson.

Making Gay History in the Classroom with Eric Marcus (Making Gay History) and Debra Fowler (History UnErased)
@
Andover Hall, Room 103

Making Gay History is a podcast that brings queer history to life through the voices of the people who lived it. Based on Eric Marcus’s decades-old archive of audio oral history interviews with LGBTQ and ally trailblazers, it uncovers forgotten stories from the fight for equal rights.  Join us for a live edition of the show exploring the personal history of Debra Fowler, co-founder of Making Gay History’s education partner, History UnErased. From receiving a dishonorable discharge to becoming a champion for inclusive curricula, Debra has been making gay history for decades.

Fake Out with Zoe Kontes (Looted)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

Think everything you see in a museum is exactly what the label says? Guess again. We’ll examine artifacts formerly displayed in major U.S. museums that have been exposed as forgeries. And some questionable objects still on display. . .

Recovering Poetic Vision in a Technological Age with James Landes (Wholly Orders)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 117

What might the vision of the poet offer those of us living in an age marked by the success and seemingly inexorable ‘progress’ of science and technology in reshaping and defining our world and our relationship to it? How might the vision articulated by poets and other poetically-minded contemplatives (e.g. Heidegger) within the Western philosophical tradition offer an alternative to the now dominant mechanistic scientific worldview that emerged from within that same tradition?

Cycle of Mathematics: Development to Publication to Inspiration with Samuel Hansen (Relatively Prime)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 116

Come along on a journey which will track a piece of mathematics from its beginning as an idea generated by an offhand comments about handshakes by a graduate student's father all the way to its role inspiring a physicist to studying community structures in networks, with some pit stops for peer review and a tour of a mathematically important building in Ann Arbor in between.

Black Patriotic Masculinity: Black Military Performance as Citizenship in the Age of Revolution with Adam McNeil (New Books in African American Studies)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 213

The period between the American Revolution and War of 1812 drastically changed the freedom prospects for many enslaved persons in North America. Arguably, the group within African American life who benefited most from the conflict were free Black maritime workers and those gaining freedom from naval service. Without contemporary passports to delineate belonging to a particular nation in the aftermath of the American Revolution and in the early American republic, Black and white sailors, upon receipt of Seamen Protection Certificates, held the first true citizenship documents. When the British Royal Navy began abducting American seamen though, Black sailors’ citizenship was endangered in ways white men were not because of British slave trading of Africans. Through examinations of military and manumission records, along with Black sailor petitions to Congress for freedom from British naval bondage, this talk will explore how enslaved and free Black maritime servicemen and laborers perceived themselves as revolutionary actors and members of the American citizenry. In doing so, the talk interrogates the roles masculinity, patriotism, and military service played as catalysts for Black men to fight, struggle, and even die for the American cause without knowing exactly how their actions would benefit their race.


11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

MAIN STAGE KEYNOTE

@ Paine Hall

A Hardcore Conversation with Dan Carlin (Hardcore History)

Presentation of American Psychological Association Presidential Award to Dr. David Van Nuys

Dan Carlin in conversation with Zachary Davis


2:00 - 2:30 PM

PUBLIC TALKS

Language Change: Americans (and Other English Speakers) Just Love to Vote with Mignon Fogarty (Grammar Girl)
@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

People love to tell me their pet peeves, so I’ll share one of mine and talk about the best way to advocate for your opinions—it’s not red ink. It’s voting. You vote with your language, and we’ll see how people voted in the past and how people are voting today. Plus, I promise you will leave being able to spell “bureaucracy” without a dictionary.

The Boston Monorail and the Transportation Future We Didn't Get with Wade Roush (Soonish)
@
Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

Sometimes we reject new technologies because they're not good enough; sometimes we reject them because they're too good. Come hear Wade Roush, host of the podcast Soonish, tell the little-known story of the Meigs Monorail. This streamlined, elevated transportation system was set to take over public transportation in the Boston region in the 1880s—until it met its untimely demise.

Noisy Voices: A History of Experimental Radio with Andrew Leland (The Organist)

@ Andover Hall, Room 102

What does it mean for a podcast or radio story to be “innovative” or “experimental”? Is it in the writing? The structure? The use of sound? This audio-rich talk will offer an eccentric history of (mostly English-language, documentary-oriented) radio, with an ear toward the ways that radio (and podcast) conventions formed, were reinvented, and then coopted, from the birth of radio to the present podcasting moment.

Ireland and the 1916 Rising: 'A Terrible Beauty is Born' with Zack Twamley (When Diplomacy Fails)
@ Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

In 1916, Irish rebels rose up in Dublin. Thanks to their martyrdom at the hands of the British establishment, Ireland would be 'changed, changed utterly' forever after. The bravery and integrity of the rebels were lauded, and have since become part of Ireland's founding mythology. However, as I have argued in my 1916 Rising Centenary podcast miniseries, and as I will argue in my talk, several uncomfortable consequences have flowed from the actions of these rebels. Irish history, especially the more vibrant, 'glorious' parts, is more myth than fact, and the truth deserves to be known.

Why Neuroscience Matters with Ginger Campbell (Brain Science: Neuroscience for Everyone)
@ Andover Hall, Room 103

Ginger Campbell, MD, host of the long running Brain Science podcast argues that understanding basic Neuroscience is an critical  element of science literacy in the 21st Century. She shares practical examples of how this knowledge can not only help people understand themselves and others, but also grasp essential principles about how science is really done.

Rediscovering Wisdom: History as an Antidote to Cynicism and Doubt with Brad Harris (Context)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

All around us, in the news and on social media, we are bombarded by cynicism; a highlight reel of humanity’s shortcomings and counterfactuals that undermines our confidence in ourselves and in our understanding of the world.  Formal education is failing to fortify us against this. Humanities curricula are increasingly designed to cultivate doubt in the existence of truth and in the idea of progress. Intellectuals of every stripe are retreating from the big questions about what is good and what is true in the work of civilization to seek the safety of ever more esoteric slices of scholarship instead.  Where do we find inspiration in this environment? Where do we find wisdom? Brad Harris is trying to help us rediscover it. In his new podcast, Context, he guides his audience through engagements with some of the most ambitious works of history ever written in an effort to preserve perspective on the progress of the modern world and restore confidence in identifying the good and the true in humanity's efforts along the way.

Melanie Klein's "A Study of Envy and Gratitude" and Mariana Ortega's "Hometactics" with B Lee Aultman (Always Already)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 117

Affect theory and feminist phenomenology are powerful supplements for contemporary critical theory. Melanie Klein's psychoanalytic theories of affect provide an alternative point of departure from conspiratorial reason: namely, the desire for repairing what is broken within a subject's object-relations is indispensable to alleviating anxiety in a troubling world. Similarly, Mariana Ortega's Latina feminist phenomenology emphasizes ordinary practices of self-care, or "hometactics," as vital to anchoring marginalized women's feelings of being-at-ease in otherwise alienating Anglo-centered worlds.

A Facts-Based Journey: The Birth and Death of a Universe with Pamela Gay (Astronomy Cast)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 116

How do we study stars we can’t touch, and galaxies we can’t visit? And where did our Universe come from anyway? To understand the space around us, astronomers have to go to great extremes as they put detectors of light, particles, and waves all across, inside, and above our world. Come along as Dr Pamela Gay explains how we know what we know about our Universe, and looks ahead to its cold, dark death many trillion years in the future.

Living, Breathing History in Ancient Athens with Robert Sims (History in the Making)
@
Divinity Hall, Room 106

The most incredible things to ever happen to humanity happened to someone. People lived through it all and our present day is a perpetual aftershock of their distant and immediate past. Join Rob Sims of History in the Making as we visit Ancient Athens during a few of their defining moments. We watch history go from a static thing that happened in the past to a constantly evolving, pulsing thing that affects every moment we exist.

Why We're All Insecure (And 5 Surprising Ways to Feel More Confident) with Ellen Hendriksen (Savvy Psychologist)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 213

We all have days when we feel as insecure as a newly released cryptocurrency. Rest assured: insecurity is a universal part of the human condition. But it’s still a drag. Therefore, backed by five lines of psychological research, Ellen Hendriksen will explore 5 ways to believe in yourself, even at those moments your confidence has the consistency of Jell-O.


2:00 - 4:00 PM

WORKSHOP

Painting Stories with Sound: Audio Editing for Storytellers with Melissa Cáceres & Chris Mottes (Hindenburg)
@
Rockefeller Hall, Room 113

Let’s face it, creating a podcast as a storyteller can get complicated. What if it didn’t have to be? Telling a great story is your core competence, but how can you concentrate on that when you need to create a broadcast-quality podcast without a professional engineer?

In this hands-on workshop, Melissa and Chris will equip you with the basic skills you need to produce a high-quality podcast, including setting up a multitrack session, making your vocals crisp and clear, basic editing techniques for natural sounding conversation and some simple buff and shine techniques.

You will learn to: 1. Import audio from different sources and formats. 2. Record local and phone interviews. 3. Organise your raw tape. 4. Make basic automations (Ducks, soundbeds, edits, fades, etc). 5. Make advanced automations (Multitrack editing). 6. Set levels correctly for different formats. 7. Use plugins (EQ, noise reduction, compression). 8. Export and upload your final product.

We will work in Hindenburg Journalist PRO, and all attendees will receive a 6-month trial to allow them to practice their skills afterwards.

Hindenburg is the only audio editor specifically designed to allow you to concentrate on telling your story without spending all your energy on the technical stuff.


2:45 - 4:00 PM

PUBLIC TALKS

Investigation & Narrative: Lessons Learned in the True Crime Genre (presented by Audioboom) Kelly Horan (Last Seen), Alex Hannaford (Dead Man Talking), Joseph Lichterman (The Lenfest Institute)
@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

Journalists Alex Hannaford and Kelly Horan discuss their move into podcasting from the worlds of print and broadcast journalism. They'll talk about the challenges of finding new angles in well-documented stories that occurred years ago and share tips on transitioning from reportage to narrative in order to better engage audiences.


2:45 - 3:15 PM

PUBLIC TALKS

The Role of Storytelling in Public Philosophy with Barry Lam (Hi-Phi Nation)
@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

Barry Lam will talk about the structural differences between narratives and the kind of abstract big ideas you find in philosophy and theoretical academic work, and how we can bridge that gap.

Marshall's Stronghold: Deliberative Justice in the Face of Populist Fervor with Thomas Daly (American Biography)
@ Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

When Thomas Jefferson and his Republican acolytes sweep into federal office in the election cycle of 1800, Jefferson believed he was presiding over a second American Revolution that was, "as real a revolution in the principles of our government as that of 1776 was in its form."

As Jeffersonian republicanism took control of the Executive and Legislative branches they brought with them a peculiar theory of jurisprudence which envisioned a role for the popular, elective branches of government they now controlled to play in the interpretation of laws and the administration of justice. Just prior to the Republican take over however, in the last days of John Adams's presidency there was a flurry of appointments made to the federal judiciary, including the appointment of new Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, John Marshall.  Jefferson lamented the federalist party he'd just trounced at the polls had "retired into the judiciary as a stronghold . . . and from that battery all the works of Republicanism are to be beaten down and destroyed." The Courts would indeed be Marshall's stronghold from hat would ultimately prove, not only be the rock upon which Jeffersonian populism broke, but also to be the rock upon which more deliberate forms of justice based on due process would be built.

In Defense of the Dubious: Encouraging Critical Thought by Examining Suspect Ideas with Nathaniel Lloyd (Historical Blindness)
@ Andover Hall, Room 102

Conspiracy theories, hoaxes, pseudohistory, claims of the supernatural: some teachers and historians understandably recoil from bringing up these ideas. Like journalists, they can be loath to amplify nonsense for fear of normalizing it or seeming like crackpots themselves. But these are often the stories and ideas that spark interest in students and readers, and they prove especially useful in demonstrating the importance of critical thinking.

Ear Witness to Two Revolutions with David Van Nuys (Shrink Rap Radio)
@ Andover Hall, Room 103

As the host and creator of the Shrink Rap Radio psychology podcast that began in 2005, the first year of the podcasting phenomenon, it’s been my privilege to witness two revolutions during that 13-year period, one in podcasting (e.g. audience growth, advent of ad networks) and the other in psychology (e.g. neuroscience, epigenetics, spirituality).  In my presentation, I will touch on the landmark developments in each.

Global Refugee Crisis: What’s Happening and How Do We Solve It? Ravi Gurumurthy (Displaced)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

65 million people are now displaced - more people than at any time since World War II. On Displaced, we've talked to foreign policy thinkers about what is driving displacement and keeping wars going in Syria, Afghanistan and Yemen, but also to innovators, policymakers and practitioners about what solutions look promising. In my talk, I'll touch on what I've learned in our first series: Why is it that the Middle East has seen more conflict in the last decade, while most parts of Africa have seen less? What can we learn from Uganda and Jordan about giving refugees rights to work? Why refugee camps and traditional aid organizations should be abolished. And what are the most promising innovations that address the most intractable problems, like malnutrition in South Sudan, or intimate partner violence in Liberia.

Can the Working Class Speak? with Maximilian Alvarez (Working People)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 117

Capitalism is destroying everything, including (and especially) our collective capacity to fight back. Day by day, more wealth and power is concentrated in the hands of the ruling class while more and more working people struggle just to get by. This is not the way things have always been—or have to be. A better, more just, equitable, dignified, and sustainable world is not only possible; it is, increasingly, our only hope. But we have to work for it together; we have to stick up for one another, to find common cause. And yet, sadly, the toil and burden of our shared condition of economic precariousness and political powerlessness beats us down, makes us unfree, and drives us further into isolation. How do we overcome these dehumanizing obstacles? How do we build hope and solidarity out of loneliness and defeatism? How do we claw our way back to one another? This talk will discuss the inspiration for the podcast Working People and the political necessity of employing podcasting as one tool among many for building a shared class conscious and affirming the humanity of our fellow workers.

The China Space with Laszlo Montgomery (China History Podcast)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 116

Seeing Early America Everywhere: Connecting Eighteenth-Century History to Unexpected Places with Andrew Hermeling (The Way of Improvement Leads Home)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 106

Colonial Puritans and Colin Kaepernick. Mount Vernon and Mar-a-Lago. Eighteenth-century midwifery and Obamacare. These may seem like odd connections, but in their efforts to prove that #everythinghasahistory, early American historians and podcasters John Fea and Drew Dyrli Hermeling regularly demonstrate that today's hot-button issues have eighteenth-century antecedents. If you look close enough, you can see early America everywhere.

Work Less & Do More with Stever Robbins (Get-It-Done Guy Podcast)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 213

Want to know how to get everything you’ve ever wanted? In our fantasies, our fondest dreams arrive on a silver platter. And someone else even carries the platter! But in real life, you hafta work. At least personal productivity, life hacking, apps, and technology bring you closer to your fantasy ideal. … or do they? Come learn what really makes you productive, and helps you reach your goals. Stever Robbins, 11-year host of Get-It-Done Guy’s Quick and Dirty Tips to Work Less and Do More, shares his tips and insights on taming your to-dos, technology,  in how to get what you want, without working very hard. Come prepared to take notes. On paper.


3:30 - 4:00 PM

PUBLIC TALKS

May the Rite of Spring Have this Dance? with Tamar Avishai (The Lonely Palette)
@Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

When you listen to the ominous opening strain of the Rite of Spring, you might imagine figures arrhythmically stomping in a heaving, primordial landscape... or when you look at Matisse's The Dance, you might hear a dissonant oboe, a crashing of symbols.  As it turns out, this popular association is popular for a reason, and deeply rooted in the early 20th century cross-pollination of the art, music, and dance from St. Petersburg to Paris and back again. Join Tamar Avishai, host of The Lonely Palette, as she dives into Matisse, Stravinsky, and the cultural history responsible for our own primal ability to see music, and to hear paintings.

People's History: How Oral Tradition Saved My Culture with Kristaps Andrejsons (The Eastern Border)
@ Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

Latvia, and eastern Europe in general, have been stomped over for centuries, and yet, the oral storytelling has preserved our culture, our identity and in the end, gained us our independence. My show's slogan is "Happiness is Mandatory"—and a lot of people think it's a parody about the oppressive, external "Be happy and follow what we tell you or die" way of thought. But it's really not. It's about being truly happy, when you're told to be happy. When we weren't allowed to learn how to read and write, when we were brutal serfs for hundreds of years, we had our folk songs, the wisdom of the people, shared in the oral tradition. And in the Soviet era, the political jokes also were there, to "check out" your colleagues, to test their true loyalties. For us, over here, the spoken word has always been a way to fight against power, a way of enduring. And we did. So, I'll talk about how the spoken word saved my people and why podcasting of the modern age is a continuation of that tradition - and what can the western people learn from our struggles

Emotions: Facts vs Fictions with Lisa Feldman Barrett (Northeastern University)
@ Andover Hall, Room 103

Democratizing Expertise Avi Green (No Jargon)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

From healthcare, to immigration, to the economy, and so much more, experts can contribute evidence and facts that could help people make better choices. In a democracy, experts can't -- and shouldn't -- fix our problems by themselves. Avi Green, co-host of the No Jargon podcast, lays out why everyone has a stake in the battle over expertise, innovation, science, and truth.

Catastrophic Disruption: How the Printing Press Ignited Anti-Witch Hysteria in Early Modern Europe with Benjamin Jacobs (Wittenberg to Westphalia)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 117

The printing press was the classic disruptive technology. It changed the way information was produced, the way it was consumed, and the way the population of Europe thought about the world. While some downsides to this revolution have been acknowledged, the emerging link between the printing press and mass casualty events in Early Modern Europe is only starting to be explored now. In a time when new technology is once again democratizing misinformation, the events of Early Modern Europe have become more important than ever.

Latter-day Exorcism: Casting out Devils in Mormon History with Blair Hodges (BYU Maxwell Institute Podcast)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 116

In 1888, a Mormon woman in the Southern States mission of the LDS Church requested a visit from the missionaries. She said she was possessed by the devil and asked the elders to help her by the laying on of hands. They were happy to comply and the evil spirit was summarily dismissed. Then things took a turn for the weird. This, and other stories of evil spirits throughout the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There may or may not be a Ouija Board on hand to help answer some questions.

Herodotus, the Father of (Digressive) History with Ryan Stitt (The History of Ancient Greece)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 106

The History of Ancient Greece (THOAG) tells the story of the ancient Greeks, who not only inhabited the modern-day Greek mainland but also all around the Mediterranean and Black seas. In fact, the Greek philosopher Plato described them as “sitting like frogs around a pond". But this isn’t just a podcast about stories, and it isn’t just about political and military history, either. There is a particular emphasis on social history, that is how the people actually lived their day-to-day lives, as well as their culture—art, architecture, philosophy, literature, religion, science, and all those other awesome aspects of the Greek achievement. THOAG also focuses on cultic practices and mythology, and thus what the people actually believed and did, all in order to understand them better. Each episode is jammed-pack with details, and every retelling is chalk-full of digressions, but we always seem to find our way back to the original topic at hand. But why tell history in this style? Well, you only need to look back to Herodotus for the inspiration. Join Ryan Stitt in a discussion about the life, influences, and methodology of Herodotus, who Cicero later dubbed as the “Father of History”.

The World Might be Broken with David Torcivia and Daniel Forkner (Ashes Ashes)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 213

For millennia, people have predicted the end times, and modern claims of existential threats are often countered with examples of human success following ancient civilization collapse (like the Late Bronze Age collapse or the fall of the Roman Empire). However, the complex interconnectedness of our modern world through extreme geopolitics, stretched economics, and our souring relationship with nature leads us to ask: is this time different? If so, is there anything we can do, or will our increasing reliance on delicate and failing systems be our downfall?


4:15 - 4:45 PM

PUBLIC TALKS

The Reformation with Patrick Wyman (Tides of History)
@
Andover Hall, Sperry Room

The Reformation is one of the defining processes of the last 500 years. How should we understand it? How did it interact with other developments in society? Patrick and Leah discuss a few recent books that offer answers to those questions.

The New American Songbook: A Podcast About Immigrant Musicians with Heidi Shin (New American Songbook)
@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

What's it like to be a security guard in the Back Bay, but a celebrity rapper back home in Haiti?  Or a Cambodian American musician who, in a strange twist of fate, survives a genocide which targeted artists and musicians...by playing music?  Come hear these stories told by Heidi Shin co-creator and producer of The New American Songbook, a podcast about immigrant musicians, produced with the support of The GroundTruth Project and WGBH.  

The CIA/AbEx Connection with Jennifer Dasal (ArtCurious)
@ Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

What does the CIA have to do with Modern Art? Plenty, believe it or not. To find out how the USA fought the Cold War with the (inadvertent) help of Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and others, join Jennifer Dasal, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art at the North Carolina Museum of Art, and founder of the ArtCurious Podcast, as she explores the topic of the secretive support of Abstract Expressionism by the government.

There Were Bones Everywhere with Meredith Johnson (Origin Stories)
@ Andover Hall, Room 102

Alia Gurtov was a graduate student when she saw a Facebook message that changed her life. A few short weeks later she was in South Africa, crawling deep inside a treacherous cave system to a chamber strewn with ancient and mysterious bones. The fossils she helped recover have changed the story of human evolution and added a strange new relative to our family tree.

Academic Therapy: Podcasting for Early Career Researchers with James Heathers (Everything Hertz)
@
Andover Hall, Room 103

Why Young Chinese Believe in Money with Mable Chan (One in a Billion)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

One in a Billion is a podcast about Chinese culture and society through the voices of young Chinese or Americans with ties to China. Our latest episode “This Chinese Life: What does it mean to be Chinese?” I got a deeper sense of why young Chinese believe in money. Do they worship money? No. Are they gold-diggers? Not really. But Chinese millennials (415 million born in 80s and 90s) are under crushing cultural pressure in China to prove that they are normal grown-ups in a country on the rise. Join me as we take a listen to a portion of this podcast and share thoughts on what we’ve learned.

The Rainbow Connection: Color Words with Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster (The Endless Knot)

@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 117

Color seems like a pretty basic and universal concept, but as it turns out different peoples, and different languages, divide up the spectrum in different ways. And furthermore the words we use to describe different colors, and the associations they have for us can reveal a lot about our different cultural preoccupations. So we’ll have a look at some of the more interesting color words and examine their etymologies and cultural contexts from the ancient world to the Middle Ages to today.

It Pays to Polarize with Erik Fogg (ReConsider)
@ Rockefeller Hall, Room 116

If you're worried that the country is becoming more polarized, you're right to be concerned: it is. But it's probably not for the reasons you think, or hear about. Rather than having a convenient villain to destroy, the United States' political system has been distorted by systemic incentives that booth politicians and media outlets must follow if they're to win--and it's tearing us apart.

Simplified Stories with Colin Wright (Let’s Know Things)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 106

For a variety of reasons and in countless ways we simplify the stories we tell each other. Although often beneficial from some perspectives and for some priorities, these simplifications can distort our understanding of other people, ourselves, and the world.


5:00 - 5:30 PM

PUBLIC TALKS

History and Memory from 1968 with Phillip Martin (Heat and Light)
@ Andover Hall, Sperry Room

Heat and Light is a sound rich intersection of history and memory focused on lesser known watershed events of 1968; history as told by academics in conversation with host Phillip Martin,  a national award-winning senior investigative reporter with WGBH public radio. He brings memories of the mood of the nation in 1968 to the table, such as the Detroit uprisings of that year in response to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.  Heat and Light debuted in September of this year and was immediately catapulted into the top 100 most listened to political podcasts. The seven-part series also relies on archival sound. Heat and Light is produced by The Conversation US, which arose out of deep-seated concerns for the fading quality of our public discourse – and recognition of the vital role that academic experts can play in the public arena.  Independent and not-for-profit, it is part of a global network of newsrooms first launched in Australia in 2011. The Conversation began its US operations in 2014, and now also publishes in Canada, the UK, France, Indonesia, Africa, Spain as well as Australia.

Spiritual Machines: Religion and Transhumanism with Zachary Davis (Ministry of Ideas)
@ Andover Hall, Andover Chapel

Ever since early scientists began experimenting with immortality elixirs in the middle ages, religion has been influencing transhumanism. Now, we’re beginning to see transhumanism influencing religion.

What Have the Romans Ever Done for Our Podcast? with Rhiannon Evans (Emperors of Rome)
@
Divinity Hall, Divinity Chapel

In 106 episodes (so far) the Emperors of Rome podcast has investigated numerous aspects of ancient Rome—emperors, of course, but aspect of Rome such as literary culture, gender politics, social hierarchies and political invective. This talk will consider the value of looking at the Romans as parallels for these still topical issues. As well as giving an introduction to the material of the podcast, I’ll ask, is it worth linking up Nero and the neocons? What can we learn from the Romans’ ability to eviscerate opponents with cutting remarks? And just what is the link between soap opera ‘bitches’ and Rome’s imperial family?

Regarding English with Kevin Stroud (The History of English: The Spoken History of A Global Language)
@ Andover Hall, Room 102

Kevin Stroud examines the development of the English language by tracing the evolution of an ancient word for guardians through 5000 years of linguistic history.

Robovie Doesn't Want to Go in the Closet! with Annie Minoff (Undiscovered)
@ Andover Hall, Room 103

When robots start acting like humans, stuff gets weird. Recently on Undiscovered, we delved into a decade-old experiment that tried to suss out what our future relationships with robots could look like. Psychologists introduced a group of kids to Robovie: a wide-eyed robot who could talk, play, and hug like a pro. And then, they did something heartbreaking to Robovie! The researchers wanted to see just how far kids’ empathy for a robot would go. What they didn’t count on, was just how complicated their own feelings for Robovie would get. See all the robot footage I couldn’t include in the podcast!

The Critical Nature of Heterodoxy with Chris Martin (Half Hour of Heterodoxy)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 211

American social science departments have consistently leaned toward the political and religious left. This ideological skew may be necessary for some social sciences, such as social work, but it also has costs. The scope of research projects has been constrained by taboos that prompt self-censorship, research data have been limited in their scope, and the characterization of other ideologies has been impoverished. In this talk, I discuss how a certain type of judicious, evidence-based heterodoxy is critical for social science podcasts. I also explain some tactics that hosts can use to express skepticism toward their guests' perspectives while maintaining rapport during the whole interview. The podcast that I host, Half Hour Of Heterodoxy, is produced by Heterodox Academy, a non-partisan organization that works on facilitating constructive disagreement in the academy.

Still Not World War III: Why Popular Foreign Policy Predictions Keep Being Wrong with Xander Snyder (ReConsider) in Rockefeller Hall, Room 116

Why does popular and social media repeatedly, incorrectly predict disastrous foreign policy events such as World War III? It's not just a desire for attention-catching headlines, but also a systemic failure to provide context for breaking developments that often leads readers to deeply misinterpret the state of the world. Xander Snyder, co-host of ReConsider and analyst at Geopolitical Futures, will help you spot these systemic patterns in the news and arm you to start seeking out that much-needed context for yourself.

A Thousand Dead Republics: Can Ancient History Save America? with Vanya Visnjic (Ancient Greece Declassified)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 106

The recent rise of populism and polarization in America and Europe has sparked a flurry of articles by pundits and intellectuals comparing the trajectory of the US today with some dire moment or other in the history of ancient Athens or Rome. A prominent example of this was Andrew Sullivan's 2016 piece “America Has Never Been So Ripe for Tyranny,” which went viral in the lead-up to the last presidential election. While some historians claim that such analogies drawn across millennia are unhelpful, others maintain that ancient examples of constitutional government provide us with a wealth of relevant data from which we can extract useful lessons, warnings, and predictions about the fate of our own republic. This lecture explores the potential pitfalls and benefits of studying ancient republics with a view to better understanding America's situation today.


5:45 - 6:15 PM

CLOSING KEYNOTE

In Podlandia, Citizenship Calls for Intentionality with Juleyka Lantigua-Williams (Lantigua Williams & Co.)
@ Andover Chapel